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Skills Next Series

Canadians’ needs for skills training and education are changing quickly.

In response, the Public Policy Forum, the Diversity Institute, and the Future Skills Centre have joined together to publish Skills Next, a series that explores what is working in workplaces, universities, and the labour market – and where workers are falling through the gaps in our skills training system.

Our first set of Skills Next papers was released in January and February of 2020. Each report focuses on one issue — such as the impact of technology in the workplace, gig work, digital skills, and barriers to employment that some marginalized groups experience — and reviews the existing state of knowledge on this topic and identifies areas in need of additional research.

Skills Next

Skills Next—Winter 2020

On the Skills Next authors

The series is authored by an expansive and diverse network of researchers and subject matter experts carefully selected to provide a broad-range of perspectives within a Canadian context. Their varied backgrounds, experiences, and expertise have shaped their individual perspectives, their analyses of the current skills ecosystem, and the reports they have authored.

Skills Next is funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Centre.

For more information contact:

Kathleen Powderly
Responsible Comms
[email protected]

Peter Aterman
Future Skills Centre – Communications Manager
[email protected]

Tomek Sysak
Public Policy Forum – Communications Specialist
[email protected]

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A Typology of Gig Workers in Canada: Towards a new model for understanding gig work through human, social, and economic capital

This paper offers a conceptual framework and preliminary typology of gig work and workers, based on a thorough review and synthesis of the existing research, designed to be tested “in the field” with real gig workers themselves.
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The Next Wave: Automation and Canada’s Labour Market

This Commentary assesses the likely impact of technological automation on Canada’s labour market and compares these results to past predictions. In fact, they show a lower proportion of employment at high risk of automation (about 22 percent) than most previous estimates.
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Measuring Social and Emotional Skills

Social and emotional skills (SES) play a critical role in the success of individuals and organizations. But, until now, there has been no comprehensive and integrated resource to identify and compare SES measurement tools. We released a new resource for users to measures social and emotional skills in adolescents and adults
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