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Labour Demand Trends During the COVID-19 Pandemic

This report is based on an analysis of online job postings in the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods. We discuss both changes in total job postings and changes in job postings across geography, occupations, skills, and sectors.
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Skills for the Post-Pandemic World

This paper contributes to the development of a post-pandemic skills agenda by clarifying broad changes and continuities in the economy and society that could have implications for skills and identifying a set of key themes on which further research is needed to better understand the challenges and opportunities which we face
Woman looking at computer and coding.

A Foundation For the Next Normal: Outlook of Technology Adoption & its Impact in the Canadian Workplace

This document reflects results on a prospective future before a seismic shift occurred. The research we present here is no longer a good indication of what is to come, but a good indication of how things were.
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A Typology of Gig Workers in Canada: Towards a new model for understanding gig work through human, social, and economic capital

This paper offers a conceptual framework and preliminary typology of gig work and workers, based on a thorough review and synthesis of the existing research, designed to be tested “in the field” with real gig workers themselves.
Concept of digital diagram,graph interfaces,virtual screen,connections icon on blurred background.Coworking team meeting.

The Next Wave: Automation and Canada's Labour Market

This Commentary assesses the likely impact of technological automation on Canada’s labour market and compares these results to past predictions. In fact, they show a lower proportion of employment at high risk of automation (about 22 percent) than most previous estimates.

Competency Frameworks and Canada’s Essential Skills

Whether it's new technology or global events driving the pace of change, Canadians are being asked to adapt in the workplace. Canada needs an essential skills framework that includes and looks beyond simple literacy and numeracy. It needs to include the 'soft skills' that industry leaders say are key to success and other essential skills that will help Canadians adapt, no matter what comes their way. Each needs to be measured and tracked to ensure Canadians remain globally competitive, and this paper argues that renewing Canada’s Essentials Skills framework is the place to start.
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Technology-Enabled Innovations in the Skills and Employment Ecosystem

This paper outlines places where technology can or is providing innovative approaches to skills training. This includes the assessment of skills, development of skills, and the alignment of supply and demand -- including advancing bias-free recruitment. With real-world examples from around the world, it also reviews how technology can improve access, diversity and workplace inclusivity amongst equity-seeking groups.
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Small and Medium-Sized Employers (SMEs): Skills Gaps and Future Skills

Canada’s small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) account for more than 90 percent of private-sector jobs in Canada. To be competitive in today’s market, they need the right people with the right skills, yet they are disproportionately threatened by labour shortages and skills gaps - a situation made worse by COVID-19. Unlike large corporations, SMEs possess limited resources, making it exponentially more challenging to support these human resources needs. There is a dire need for innovative research & solutions.