Polygon Created with Sketch. Home | Research

Social and Emotional Skills

As automation and other technological changes continue to disrupt the nature of work, the skillset that Canadians develop through their post-secondary training is a key foundation for workplace success.

In the emerging economy, technical skills are only part of the current and future skills needs equation. In fact, more than ever, success in the workplace requires social and emotional skills, which encompass the ability to regulate emotions and behaviours, collaborate with others, communicate effectively, and adapt to new workplace environments and challenges. Social and emotional skills are highly sought-after by employers, but they’re tough to teach and tough to measure. With an eye on how to prepare Canadians for workplace success in an evolving labour market, this project will seek to identify emerging and best practices for developing and assessing social and emotional skills.

A group of individuals looking at computer screens.

While skills development is a life-long endeavour, a key foundation for workplace success is the skills training that Canadians receive through post-secondary training. The first year of this multi-year project will therefore focus primarily on the current state of social and emotional skills training and development in Canadian post-secondary education (PSE) institutions. The main question we aim to answer is: How are PSE programs targeting social and emotional skills development in order to prepare graduates for work and citizenry? 

Other research projects

Bridging the Digital Skills Gap: Alternative Pathways

Digital skills and digital careers are part of every industry’s future. Yet employers say they can’t find workers with the information and communication technology (ICT) […]
An individual wearing an augmented reality headset to visualize two office towers

Thinking Twice About Technology and the Future of Work

Technology is being used to change power balances in workplaces and to perpetuate long-standing precarious employment relationships, Jim Stanford argues. But the exploitative practices of the gig economy reflect deliberate choices, rather than the inevitable onward march of technology, and creating better jobs also lies within our power.
Diverse group of processionals dicussing project

Solving the Skills Puzzle: The Missing Piece is Good Information

In a world of work increasingly driven by the supply and demand of skills rather than the qualifications of graduates, employers have trouble finding the workers they need and workers struggle to keep up with changing demands. Emna Braham and Steven Tobin explain how better and more accessible labour market information lies at the heart of clarifying the skills and training needs of today and tomorrow.
The Future Skills Centre is a forward-thinking centre for research and collaboration dedicated to preparing Canadians for employment success and meeting the emerging talent needs of employers. As a pan-Canadian community, we bring together experts and organizations across sectors to rigorously identify, assess, and share innovative approaches to develop the skills and work environments to drive prosperity and inclusion.