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Measuring Social and Emotional Skills

Social and emotional skills (SES) play a critical role in the success of individuals and organizations. But, until now, there has been no comprehensive and integrated resource to identify and compare SES measurement tools.

We, along with our partnership with The Conference Board of Canada have released a new resource for users to measures social and emotional skills in adolescents and adults. This new digital platform provides a curated guide to key social and emotional skill measurement resources. These include the “Emotional Quotient Inventory” that assesses a range of social and emotional skills in workplace environments, such as decision-making and interpersonal skills; the “Emotional and Social Competency Inventory” that measures emotional intelligence in post-secondary students and adults, and identifies areas for improvement; and the “Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT),” an ability-based test for adults that measures emotional intelligence in everyday scenarios in educational, corporate and research settings.

Additionally, The Conference Board of Canada and Future Skills Centre have summarized the top evidence-based, internationally applied studies on social and emotional skills measurement and development. These studies provide insights on how social and emotional skills can be conceptualized through comprehensive competency frameworks; how competency frameworks have been used to measure social and emotional skills in adolescents and adults, and across socio-demographic, educational, and professional contexts; and how measurement tools have been used to understand the impact of interventions that target social and emotional skill development.

The Social and Emotional Skills Toolkit is funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Program.

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