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Research call on the future of skills and work in a digital economy

As digital technologies transform our economy, employees, employers and policy-makers have new opportunities to revolutionize the way we work.

To appreciate what this means for Canadians, and to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affects the transition to the digital economy, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Future Skills Centre are launching a Knowledge Synthesis Grant competition — the first partnership of this kind — on Skills and Work in the Digital Economy

By synthesizing existing knowledge, successful applicants will identify research strengths and gaps on the nature of work in the digital economy. Up to 35 grants will be awarded, each valued at $30,000 for one year.

Working in the Digital Economy is one of 16 future challenge areas identified through Imagining Canada’s Future, a SSHRC initiative that mobilizes research on critical topics to address Canada’s long-term societal challenges and inform a better future for Canadians.

The deadline to submit an application is September 3, 2020. For more information on the call for proposals, please contact: ksg-ssc@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

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