Knowledge Mobilization Strategy

The Future Skills Centre is committed to ensuring that our work is accessible to all Canadians, and that knowledge is available in the right form, at the right place, at the right time.

Too often, evidence from researchers and practitioners is published only in scholarly and professional literature, and is therefore not accessible and available to the majority of the population. A key function of knowledge mobilization is to connect evidence-producers to evidence-users through engagement and dissemination.

Successful dissemination is informed by engagement with various stakeholder groups, so that specific messages are tailored to different audiences. The Future Skills Centre is committed to learning about existing and innovative formats and channels for knowledge sharing to ensure that the information we are disseminating is meaningful and accessible for all stakeholder groups, communities, sectors, and populations.

The Conference Board of Canada and Research Impact Canada (RIC) are undertaking a coordinated (national/provincial/territorial) approach to stakeholder engagement, knowledge sharing, and impact assessment underpinned by a network of sector-specific and regional knowledge brokers.

To mobilize knowledge, we will:

  • Foster relationships with partners, stakeholders, and all actors of the skills development ecosystem;
  • Regularly exchange information with stakeholders;
  • Develop technical and plain language reports;
  • Build the capacity of the skills sector to mobilize knowledge by training stakeholders and providing online tools;
  • Disseminate information widely via events and diverse communications vehicles; and
  • Develop and maintain a searchable project database/open platform.

Engagement activities

Exterior shot of building with sign that says

Working from home is here to stay — and for some Canadians, that’s a big problemexternal link icon

April 12, 2021 — Toronto Star, written by Heather Scoffield
Person working at laptop

Helping Canadians navigate a changing job market with ‘OpportuNext’external link icon

April 8, 2021 — iPolitics, written by Susan Black and Pedro Barata
A person walks past a help wanted sign in Ottawa.

Ahead of federal budget, agency funds skills-training program to buffer against future shocksexternal link icon

April 7, 2021 — The Canadian Press, written by Jordan Press
Mother holding child close to her chest while scrolling through a laptop

On the home front: Remote work may widen inequality in Canada

Many people are managing to work from home, Environics Institute survey shows, but parents of…
Two students high-fiving

Future Skills Centre announces $32 million for projects to help Canadian workers gain skills as part of shock-proofing the workforce of the future

TORONTO (April 7, 2021) — Future Skills Centre (FSC) today announces the funding of 64 innovation…
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